Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings

✓ Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings ☆ Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson, ✓ Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings ☆ Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson, Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings, Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson, Faith in a Seed The Dispersion of Seeds Other Late Natural History Writings This major literary event contains a hitherto unpublished work The Dispersion of Seeds one of Thoreau s last important research and writing projects and places him among the first American scientists to understand the significance of Darwin s theory of Natural Selection. ✓ Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings ☆ Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson - Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings, Faith in a Seed The Dispersion of Seeds Other Late Natural History Writings This major literary event contains a hitherto unpublished work The Dispersion of Seeds one of Thoreau s last important research and writing projects and places him among the first American scientists

  • Title: Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings
  • Author: Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson
  • ISBN: 9781559631822
  • Page: 176
  • Format: paper

✓ Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings ☆ Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson

Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings, ✓ Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings ☆ Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson - Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings, Faith in a Seed The Dispersion of Seeds Other Late Natural History Writings This major literary event contains a hitherto unpublished work The Dispersion of Seeds one of Thoreau s last important research and writing projects and places him among the first American scientists

  • ✓ Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings ☆ Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson
    176Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson
Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings

964 thoughts on “Faith in a Seed: The Dispersion of Seeds & Other Late Natural History Writings

  1. Henry David Thoreau Bradley P. Dean Abigail Rorer Robert Richardson says:

    Henry David Thoreau born David Henry Thoreau was an American author, naturalist, transcendentalist, tax resister, development critic, philosopher, and abolitionist who is best known for Walden, a reflection upon simple living in natural surroundings, and his essay, Civil Disobedience, an argument for individual resistance to civil government in moral opposition to an unjust state.Thoreau s books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry total over 20 volumes Among his lasting contributions were his writings on natural history and philosophy, where he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern day environmentalism.In 1817, Henry David Thoreau was born in Massachusetts He graduated from Harvard University in 1837, taught briefly, then turned to writing and lecturing Becoming a Transcendentalist and good friend of Emerson, Thoreau lived the life of simplicity he advocated in his writings His two year experience in a hut in Walden, on land owned by Emerson, resulted in the classic, Walden Life in the Woods 1854 During his sojourn there, Thoreau refused to pay a poll tax in protest of slavery and the Mexican war, for which he was jailed overnight His activist convictions were expressed in the groundbreaking On the Duty of Civil Disobedience 1849 In a diary he noted his disapproval of attempts to convert the Algonquins from their own superstitions to new ones In a journal he noted dryly that it is appropriate for a church to be the ugliest building in a village, because it is the one in which human nature stoops to the lowest and is the most disgraced Cited by James A Haught in 2000 Years of Disbelief When Parker Pillsbury sought to talk about religion with Thoreau as he was dying from tuberculosis, Thoreau replied One world at a time Thoreau s philosophy of nonviolent resistance influenced the political thoughts and actions of such later figures as Leo Tolstoy, Mohandas K Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr D 1862.More platoanford entries thooreauerver enpedia wiki Henry_Daanscendentalism legacy.tamuography people henry

  2. As the son of a forester, even though my own path went in a different direction, I developed an interest in the woods and having enjoyed Walden many, many years ago, I was looking forward to reading Faith in a Seed Wow What mind numbing rambling I have decided that Thoreau had some variation of OCD What he chose to observe, and the detailed recording of these observations, was fascinating only from the stand point that someone would spend so much time on so many details to reveal so little Of co [...]

  3. good stuff i got sidetracked halfway through, as happens sometimes, but it brought me back, which is a good sign This is a collection of some later writings Thoreau did on natural history, particularly, as stated in the subtitle, on the dispersion of seeds those of the trees around concord are the major focus of that manuscript, including the role of squirrels and birds, about which Thoreau writes very charmingly and admiringly The poetry of the title of the collection belies the somewhat dry na [...]

  4. I ve opened this book in efforts to take a closer look into H.D.T interest the life cycles of the natural invironment, the local natural resources the woods that he admired I am hoping to learn from his ability to observe, truely see and record truthfully.Currently I am 85 pages in Henry David Thoreau describes the local seeds of the Concord area H.D addresses the shape and functions of seeds and will track their dispersal and growth He is amazing and truly sees all of the beauty of the natural [...]

  5. This book is different than Thoreau s other pieces It is a Darwinian argument of the ways that plants disperse their seeds for their organism s to survive It is not as poetic or philosophical as the things he published during his life time I don t know if that is because he didn t have the opportunity to polish it or if it is because it was intended to be a volume of a natural encyclopedia that he was writing As I understand it this is the only volume that was completed The rest was notes left [...]

  6. I am giving this book 3 stars and setting it aside for now, having gotten almost 1 3 of the way through it This is a great work of literature, as is all Thoreau that I have read, however it is heavy on the technical and there is too much going on in my life right now for me to focus enough in order to get the most out of this book It has definitely earned a permanent place in my home library and I know I will return to it someday.

  7. So far it is a great Thoreau read Seemingly with out point he babbles on about the trees of his region and their habits of reproduction His attention to detail and dedication to his notes over a decade are remarkable and fun to read Inspirational both in terms of his dedication and in regards to the steady pace of reproduction of life in general, not just human, or rather, especially not human.

  8. In these manuscripts, Thoreau is fascinated by his discovery that squirrels spread seeds that cause the forests to grow That trees grow from seeds is indisputable No such forest has ever been known to spring from anything else If anyone asserts that it sprang from something else, or from nothing, the burden of proof lies with him That squirrels spread the seeds he believes to be a novel and controversial claim, which he proceeds to demonstrate through his observations.

  9. Being a diehard fan of Thoreau, I loved it, but even for me it was tedious at times This was written in Thoreau s later years when he pretty much turned to nature scientist, so unless you re really into Thoreau and or nature study, you may want to avoid it Thoreau s personal anecdotes and, as always, quotable words of wisdom, make it special and are probably its saving grace It s very educational you learn a lot about trees especially.

  10. Has occasional quotable quotes and memorable, unique ways of seeing and describing nature but also long tedious passages with too much detail Will not be a classic like On Walden Pond It was surprising and reassuring, to see the many references and quotes from Darwin s Origin of Species which had only been published about a year before Faith in a Seed had been written.

  11. As much as I admire Thoreau, this is not what you d call a readable book It does prove that creative nonfiction is an old medium, but Thoreau wrote far engaging prose For historical reasons, biologists may relish Thoreau s early naturalism it s astonishing how much he absorbed by walking in the woods and observing , but it s not exactly designed for my demographic.

  12. This is really a meditation to read his accounts of watching squirrels gather pine cones and then gnaw them.

  13. I really enjoyed this book Seems like this year I have become interested in books on nature I also always enjoy reading Thoreau.

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